TOP 1O Wood Art For Wall-Amazing Projects

TOP 1O Wood Art For Wall-Amazing Projects
TOP 1O Wood Art For Wall
While many woods can be used for carving, there are some clear favorites, including Aspen, Basswood, Butternut, Black Walnut, and Oak. [14] Because it has almost no grain and is notably soft, Basswood is particularly popular with beginner carvers. It’s used in many lower-cost instruments like guitars and electric basses. [14] Aspen is similarly soft, although slightly harder, and readily available and inexpensive. [14] Butternut has a deeper hue than Basswood and Aspen and has a nice grain that is easy to carve, and thus friendly for beginners. It’s also suitable for furniture. [14] While more expensive that Basswood, Aspen, and Butternut, Black Walnut is a popular choice for its rich color and grain. [14] Lastly, Oak is a strong, sturdy, and versatile wood for carving with a defined grain. It’s also a popular wood for furniture making.
With the advances in modern technology and the demands of industry, woodwork as a field has changed. The development of Computer Numeric Controlled (CNC) Machines, for example, has made us able to mass-produce and reproduce products faster, with less waste, and often more complex in design than ever before. CNC Routers can carve complicated and highly detailed shapes into flat stock, to create signs or art. Rechargeable power tools speed up creation of many projects and require much less body strength than in the past, for example when boring multiple holes. Skilled fine woodworking, however, remains a craft pursued by many. There remains demand for hand crafted work such as furniture and arts, however with rate and cost of production, the cost for consumers is much higher.
The making of sculpture in wood has been extremely widely practiced, but survives much less well than the other main materials such as stone and bronze, as it is vulnerable to decay, insect damage, and fire. It therefore forms an important hidden element in the art history of many cultures.[1] Outdoor wood sculptures do not last long in most parts of the world, so it is still unknown how the totem pole tradition developed. Many of the most important sculptures of China and Japan in particular are in wood, and so are the great majority of African sculpture and that of Oceania and other regions. Wood is light and can take very fine detail so it is highly suitable for masks and other sculpture intended to be worn or carried. It is also much easier to work on than stone.

Some of the finest extant examples of early European wood carving are from the Middle Ages in Germany, Russia, Italy and France, where the typical themes of that era were Christian iconography. In England, many complete examples remain from the 16th and 17th century, where oak was the preferred medium.
Perhaps most important physical aspect of wood grain in woodworking is the grain direction or slope (e.g. against the grain). The two basic categories of grain are straight and cross grain. Straight grain runs parallel to the longitudinal axis of the piece. Cross grain deviates from the longitudinal axis in two ways, spiral grain or diagonal grain. The amount of deviation is called the slope of the grain.[3]

In describing the application of a woodworking technique to a given piece of wood, the direction of the technique may be:

with the grain (easy; giving a clean result)
against the grain (heavy going; giving a poor result such as chipping or tear-out)
across the grain (direction of cut is across the grain lines, but the plane of the cut is still aligned with them)
end grain (at right angles to the grain, for example trimming the end of a plank)
Grain alignment must be considered when joining pieces of wood, or designing wooden structures. For example, a stressed span is less likely to fail if tension is applied along the grain, rather than across the grain. Grain direction will also affect the type of warping seen in the finished item.[4]

In describing the alignment of the wood in the tree a distinction may be made. Basic grain descriptions and types include:

straight – grain which runs in a single direction, parallel to the axis of the tree
spiral – grain which spirals around the axis of the tree
interlocked – grain which spirals around the axis of the tree, but reverses its direction for periods of years resulting in alternating directions of the spiral grain

TOP 1O Wood Art For Wall-Amazing Projects