Solo Stove – The Ultimate Wood Burning, Camping and Backpacking Stove – Demonstration and Review

Solo Stove - The Ultimate Wood Burning, Camping and Backpacking Stove - Demonstration and Review
Learn more about the Solo Stove here: http://www.emergencyfoodwarehouse.com/solo-stove-brand.html

The Solo Stove really is the ultimate wood burning stove for backpacking, camping, or to put in your bug out bag. If you’re out in the wilderness wood is usually readily available. This means you wont run out of fuel or even have a tough time finding any fuel.

The Solo Stove is extremely lightweight, but built to last. It also doesn’t take up very much space compared to some other stoves. The stove folds away neatly inside of itself, fitting right into the Solo Pot. The Solo Stove Alcohol burner can also fit inside, making this an incredibly convenient package.

In this video we boiled our water in only 7 or 8 minutes with our Solo Stove and Solo Pot. This speedy boil time is great for when you’re on the move.

If you want to learn more about the Solo Stove, click here: http://www.emergencyfoodwarehouse.com/solo-stove-brand.html

If you want to learn more about the Mag-Na-Fire fire starter (as seen in the video), click here: http://www.emergencyfoodwarehouse.com/mag-na-fire-fire-starter.html

Get your FREE survival ebook here: http://www.EmergencyPreparednessMadeSimple.com/



Solo Stove – The Ultimate Wood Burning, Camping and Backpacking Stove – Demonstration and Review

15 thoughts on “Solo Stove – The Ultimate Wood Burning, Camping and Backpacking Stove – Demonstration and Review”

  1. Why doesn't everyone know that water boils more quickly with the lid on? Why would you ever care how long it takes with the lid off. Especially if you have to conserve your fuel.

  2. If you cut your fuel wood shorter so that it is below the secondary air holes, the thing gasifies properly and you get a lot less soot than the demonstration. In this demonstration fuel is being burned above the gasifying zone, so inefficient combustion and piles of soot.

  3. Thank you for your video. If you could only choose one would you get the Titan? or too big? thank you.
    craig

  4. You either used the stove improperly, or it was poorly designed. This design should have little to no soot buildup on the pot. Yes it wipes off easy, but it shouldn't have built up that much to begin with.

    The best advice is to make sure the top of the wood is a little below the holed that are inside the stove. I have a home made mountain ranger (tin can) wood stove that I use often, it is a very similar design as far as air flow is concerned, and there is little to no soot build up on the pots with use…

  5. Hi, just watched your helpful video. We have a variety of these solo stoves and also a wood burning tent stove.  If you were on the homefront, in an emergency but wanted to use wood, knowing how much wood you ended up actually using in the solo stove, would you maybe recommend just setting up the woodburning tent stove outside and cooking water in larger quantity on that…or can you do it in that?  The creosote buildup even with soap is frustrating.  Our rocket stove came with an aluminum square to cook on but heat transfer is a bit lower…any ideas?  Don't want to waste a bunch of resources (and my husbands hard work) on silly experimentation when more experienced info can jumpstart the process.  Thanks much for and thoughts.  The goal is cooking/heating water and maybe even ourselves…we live in cold place with no indoor woodstove or fireplace.

  6. ya but now everything is covered in black try some trioxane or hexane it burn very clean and it works. check out my bro red neck tech he tried what we use on our hikes through wyoming wilderness. But I do like this video…

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